... Energy efficiency, transportation sector are focuses of Baker admin's first comprehensive energy plan ...... Baker nominates Brian Sullivan of Swampscott, the guv's hometown, as Lynn District Court clerk magistrate ...... Kelcourse, DiZoglio hosting "Pastries, Politics and Policy" event Tuesday night in Amesbury ...... Brigham & Women's researchers develop smartphone-based ovulation test ...... MassVote eyes election day registration as next major reform, calling it "the ultimate solution to enhancing participatory democracy" ...... Low oil prices, corporate tax relief should negate Eversource electric rate hike, Sen. Lesser says ...... Dracut physician charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly illegally prescribing opioids to an at-risk patient that resulted in her death ...... "Luis and I mutually agreed that the time was right for him to separate from the T" - Transpo Secretary Pollack on departing GM Luis Ramirez ...... Pioneer Institute pleased that its former research director Steve Poftak has been elevated to MBTA GM ...... Westfield State University, Holyoke Community College combine resources to hire joint emergency management chief ...... Arlington Police Chief Ryan, who led addiction recovery initiatives, is retiring in January ...... EPA announcing regulatory partnership with maritime, food and beverage, and outdoor recreation sectors ...... Labor groups urging allies to rally for locked out gas workers on Dec. 19 ...... New Bedford mayor to announce infrastructure, public safety upgrades on Thursday ...... Senate making late-session bid to pass juror service bill ...... Speech-language pathologist licensing bill clears Senate ...... Like so many buses, trains and drivers, the Future of Transportation report, due on Dec. 1, will be late this year ...
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NOTICE WARNS 3D-PRINTED WEAPONS COULD VIOLATE SIX LAWS .: The State House News Service

NOTICE WARNS 3D-PRINTED WEAPONS COULD VIOLATE SIX LAWS

By Katie Lannan
STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON, AUG. 9, 2019....An individual who builds, sells or owns a 3D-printed gun in Massachusetts could run afoul of state law in six different ways, according to a notice Attorney General Maura Healey and other top law enforcement officials issued Thursday.

Attorney General Maura Healey and other law enforcement officials Thursday advised that "the creation, transfer, or possession of a weapon made with a 3D printer can subject an individual to serious criminal or civil liability under Massachusetts law." [Photo: Courtesy/Wikimedia/Vvzvlad]

The public safety notice, Healey's office said, responds to a recent U.S. State Department settlement involving the online posting of 3D-printed gun blueprints and was issued jointly with the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association, the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs of Police and the Massachusetts District Attorneys Association.

"Law enforcement in Massachusetts works very hard to make sure that firearms don't fall into the hands of the wrong people: gang members, terrorists, or those with a history committing violent crimes," Public Safety and Security Secretary Daniel Bennett said in a statement. "We need to be vigilant to make sure this new technology doesn't let these people evade the strong laws that protect the Commonwealth from gun violence."

Healey said her office and others in law enforcement "will do everything we can to keep deadly homemade weapons off our streets and out of our schools."

Healey previously joined her counterparts from other states in a lawsuit seeking to stop the 3D-printed firearm files from being posted online, and state Rep. David Linsky on Tuesday filed a bill that would make it illegal in Massachusetts for anyone who does not hold a federal firearm manufacturing license to produce a gun with 3D-printing technology.

The notice issued Thursday reminds Bay State residents "that the creation, transfer, or possession of a weapon made with a 3D printer can subject an individual to serious criminal or civil liability under Massachusetts law."

It highlights laws dealing with plastic weapons, license requirements, reporting of sales, safety requirements, safe storage and assault weapons.

Assault weapons are banned under state law, and the notice specifies that any firearms that meet the assault weapon definition "whether made in whole or in partout of plastic, is prohibited."

Healey drew backlash from gun owners in the summer of 2016 when she issued a notice advising her office would step up enforcement of the 1998 assault weapons law to also cover copies or duplicates of prohibited guns.

"As usual with our AG, public safety is only addressed when the solution involves limiting what law abiding people can do," the Gun Owners Action League said on Twitter Thursday.

The notice also states that weapons made exclusively from plastic or otherwise undetectable by X-ray machines and walk-through metal detectors are unlawful, that no firearms made with 3D-printing technology are currently authorized for sale in Massachusetts, and that all weapons must be securely stored.

-END-
08/09/2018


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